Marghanita Laski – Little Boy Lost

So, you start a book which is meant to result in emotional upheaval, and you keep your distance to begin with, but then the book sucks you in, and you feel your emotions getting the better off you, while the writing itself remains simple and straightforward, with almost no sentimentality. And as you keep turning […]

JG Ballard – Empire of the Sun

World War II literature is a genre that interests me tremendously. It would be wrong to say that I find it enjoyable, but the fact remains that I actively seek out books on WWII. So far though, most of the WWII fiction (and non-fiction) I’ve perused has taken place in Europe, so Ballard’s much acclaimed […]

Michael Chabon – The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay is well – amazing. Not only does this book celebrate the “great, mad, new American art form” and pays a tribute to the spirit of Americana in the 1930s, it simultaneously depicts the despair in Europe during the second World War, and how incredibly disconcerting the war was […]

Marghanita Laski – To Bed With Grand Music

I’ve been meaning to read a Laski for a long time, and I finally picked this book out of my shelf, just to help me return to the world of reading – one of my many loves that I’ve been ignoring recently. And on finishing it, I was gently reminded as to why I love […]

Monica Dickens – Mariana

I bought this book back in January, simply because the blurb likened it to I Capture The Castle, and ended up “saving” it for the Persephone Reading Week (hosted by Verity and Claire). I had great expectations from this book (if you may excuse the totally unnecessary pun), not only because of the blurb comparing […]

Nancy Huston – Fault Lines

It’s the third book I’ve read this year, where the narrative goes chronologically backwards – the difference being, this time, it follows four generations of six year olds, starting in 2004 and ending in 1944-45. Sol, a six year old in 2004, believes the world revolves around him, and that he’s a genius. Brought up […]

Sarah Waters – The Night Watch

Sarah Waters’ The Night Watch is the third novel I’ve read by her, and it’s as different as the previous two as it can be. While one was a gothic ghost story set in Warwickshire (The Little Stranger), the other was a Victorian thriller (Fingersmith). And then we have this: a book set (mostly in) […]

Simon Mawer – The Glass Room

Shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 2009, Simon Mawer’s immense novel revolves around The Glass Room, or, Der Glasraum: A modernist house resulting from an architect whose maxim is ornamentation is crime. The conception of the house happens when Victor (a Jew, who owns an automobile manufacturing company) and Liesel Landauer are gifted a plot […]

Michelle Magorian – Goodnight Mr. Tom

This incredibly poignant well written story tackles various important and sensitive topics, some of which are still valid today, despite the book being set around the time of the second World War. Set in the English countryside, Michelle Magorian tells the story of Willie, a timid little specimen, who is an evacuee from London, and […]

Bernhard Schlink – Homecoming

  This is another one of my reviews that have been pending for over a month. While I’m reading the super-chunky Midnight’s Children, I thought it’s a good time to get up-to-date with some of the reviews which really should have been written earlier. Homecoming was my attempt to get familiar with Schlink’s writing, before I […]

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