J.K. Rowling – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

I’m a self-confessed Potterhead. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read the books, heard the audio books (narrated by Stephen Fry), and even watched the movies despite hating them. I’ve been wary of Pottermore, and the stuff that’s continuously churned out, but hey – more Harry Potter’s a Good Thing, right? So, I […]

Betty Smith – A Tree Grows In Brooklyn

Oh, where do I begin? Remember Cassandra from I Capture The Castle? She is one of my favourite narrators and I believe you’d be hard pressed to find a character as charming as her. Betty Smith’s Francie comes close. She doesn’t have the pleasure of living in a dilapidated-yet-romantic castle as Cassandra did – instead, she’s over […]

Donna Tartt – The Goldfinch

880 pages. All consumed on the beaches of Ko Samui, greedily, and when the book ended, I was sad. After all, wasn’t it Jane Austen who said, “If a book is well written, I always find it too short.” So, I guess that makes Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer winning novel “too short.” The book is titled […]

Happiness is… The Bone Clocks

I know I’ve been AWOL for a long time now, but I feel compelled to write today. You see, today was the launch date of David Mitchell’s new book, The Bone Clocks, and he was at Foyles signing their exclusive edition for two hundred-odd people. I was one of those lucky two hundred, and I was […]

Gabriel García Márquez

I had TweetDeck open in the background last night, when I saw the AP’s tweet, “BREAKING: Source close to family says Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez has died.” He was eighty-seven, and had been in the hospital in the past couple of weeks. And yet – yet I was unbearably sad. I read One Hundred Years […]

François Bizot – The Gate

I visited Cambodia in September 2013, and prior to the trip, I purchased Bizot’s memoir detailing his days in Cambodia during the Khmer Rouge. While I didn’t have the time to read the book before landing in the Cambodian capital, I did visit the Killing Fields and the Museum of Genocide. Both left me speechless, […]

Joseph Conrad – Heart of Darkness

“The horror! The horror!” is one of those phrases that will haunt one, long after the last page of the book is turned. This book, or novella, is a ninety page almost-monologue, where the narrator is Marlow, who recounts his adventures searching for Mr. Kurtz in the darkness of Africa. Honestly, despite some incredible lines, […]

Evelyn Waugh – Scoop

This is the first book by Evelyn Waugh that I read. It also is the first book I’ve read, since I returned to the wonderful world of literature. I purchased this book, along with Brideshead Revisited, because I was drawn to the simplicity of the cover. Also, I have a book-buying problem! Scoop is a 1930s satire […]

Albert Camus – A Happy Death

The title, a contradiction in terms, was the first novel written by Camus, when he was in his mid-twenties. However, it was only published post-humously, and is considered to be a precursor to Camus’ more widely-acclaimed The Stranger (also known as The Outsider, to obfuscate matters). It has been a long time since I’ve read The Stranger, and the […]

Daphne du Maurier – The Doll: Short Stories

I’ve oft’ made a generic sweeping statement on here about how I am not a big fan of short stories. There have been collections that I’ve enjoyed, and there have been collections that I’ve struggled through. Daphne Du Maurier’s The Doll: Short Stories falls somewhere in-between. All the stories in this collection, but one, were written in […]

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