Daphne du Maurier – The Doll: Short Stories

I’ve oft’ made a generic sweeping statement on here about how I am not a big fan of short stories. There have been collections that I’ve enjoyed, and there have been collections that I’ve struggled through. Daphne Du Maurier’s The Doll: Short Stories falls somewhere in-between. All the stories in this collection, but one, were written in […]

Daphne du Maurier – The House On The Strand

What better way of spending a Sunday evening than curled up in bed, with a box of the world’s best chocolates, and a Daphne du Maurier? Well, possibly if the book wasn’t The House On The Strand… Yes, I know that’s harsh, but if you compare this book to the likes of Rebecca or My […]

Helene Hanff – 84 Charing Cross Road

If there ever was a perfect book, this would be it. Yes, I know that’s an extremely strong and subjective statement, but I don’t think many people who have read this will disagree. It’s feel-good, happy, and just… perfect. 84 Charing Cross Road revolves around two people living halfway across the world from one another, […]

Rachel Ferguson – The Brontës Went To Woolworths

The Brontës Went to Woolworths is one of those utterly bizarre books, with quirky characters and a story which makes the mind boggle. The thin line between fact and fiction is erased by the Carne sisters – the protagonists of this book – as they let their imaginations run away with them, and create a […]

Grace Metalious – Peyton Place

Oh, it’s been absolutely ages since I’ve read a 470+ page book in a day, but boy, this one was absolutely worth it. It’s been labeled “wicked”, “sordid” and even “cheap”. I half thought of The O.C. as I was reading it, albeit set in the late 1930s, and not the twenty-first century. I’ve heard […]

Muriel Spark – Loitering With Intent

There’s a thin line between reality and fiction; they oft’ reflect each other very closely, so much so that the line is indiscernible. But – what happens when reality starts imitating fiction? That’s the basic premise of Spark’s 1981 novel, starring Fleur Talbot: an aspiring writer in London in the 1950s. She’s writing her first […]

Angela Carter – Shadow Dance

Angela Carter’s debut book, Shadow Dance, is the fifth book by her that I’ve read, and it’s as bizarre as the previous three. Due to a million other things, I wasn’t able to get my thoughts out on this sooner, which is a pity, as I wanted it to tie in with Claire’s Angela Carter […]

Angela Carter – Several Perceptions

I discovered the wonderful world of Angela Carter only last year, and I’ve been trying to read all her works slowly, savouring every moment of it. Of course, the bonus is the gorgeous covers, which draws me to her books like a moth…. The thing with Several Perceptions is, it’s totally unlike anything I’ve read […]

Muriel Spark – A Far Cry From Kensington

Sometimes, I wonder about myself. Half way through this Fantastic February Female Frivolities (I like alliterations, love double alliterations…), I realised I hadn’t picked out a single Virago Modern Classic. Like I said, sometimes, I do wonder about myself. Anyway, the minute this hit me, I reached out for the first VMC I could find […]

Jennifer Dawson – The Ha-Ha

The Ha-Ha is Jennifer Dawson’s first novel, published in 1961. It follows the life of Josephine, a young woman with a mental illness, that often leaves her in hysterics, after she has been removed from Oxford and committed to a mental institution. As we sat there I could even see the even-toed ungulates marching through […]

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