Joseph Conrad – Heart of Darkness

“The horror! The horror!” is one of those phrases that will haunt one, long after the last page of the book is turned. This book, or novella, is a ninety page almost-monologue, where the narrator is Marlow, who recounts his adventures searching for Mr. Kurtz in the darkness of Africa. Honestly, despite some incredible lines, […]

Evelyn Waugh – Scoop

This is the first book by Evelyn Waugh that I read. It also is the first book I’ve read, since I returned to the wonderful world of literature. I purchased this book, along with Brideshead Revisited, because I was drawn to the simplicity of the cover. Also, I have a book-buying problem! Scoop is a 1930s satire […]

Neil Gaiman – American Gods

This book was recommended by the same person who introduced David Mitchell (number9dream) to me. It was then recommended by another colleague who borrowed number9dream from me. So, it had to be read. 590+ page chunkster or not, it had to be read. I finished it about a month back, and my head’s been reeling since. […]

Angela Carter – Nights At The Circus

When you start a book by Angela Carter, there’s only one thing that’s certain: you have no idea what you’re in for; nothing’s too crazy, nothing’s too bizarre. And of course, that’s why you love Angela Carter. Okay, scratch that. That’s why I love Angela Carter. A story partly inspired by the myth of Leda […]

Jane Austen – Northanger Abbey

Despite being the first novel that Austen started writing, Northanger Abbey was only published posthumously. It’s the second book by the much-acclaimed author that I have finished, and while I thought Pride & Prejudice was significantly more enjoyable, this book was quite readable as well. I concede that readable isn’t a very encouraging adjective for […]

J.D. Salinger – Catcher In The Rye

As some of you might already know, The Catcher In The Rye is one of my favourite books of all times. I’ve read it, and re-read it, and then read it again. At the age of fourteen, the first time I read it, I fell in love with Holden Caulfield. A decade later, I still […]

Muriel Spark – The Driver’s Seat

Oh, for such a small novella (tautology?), The Driver’s Seat covers so much, with a dark plot, completely mental characters and just bizarreness all around! Lise, a thirty-something year old woman, is stuck in a dull office job for a decade or so, and she’s about to embark on her first vacation. At the very […]

JG Ballard – Empire of the Sun

World War II literature is a genre that interests me tremendously. It would be wrong to say that I find it enjoyable, but the fact remains that I actively seek out books on WWII. So far though, most of the WWII fiction (and non-fiction) I’ve perused has taken place in Europe, so Ballard’s much acclaimed […]

Michael Chabon – The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay is well – amazing. Not only does this book celebrate the “great, mad, new American art form” and pays a tribute to the spirit of Americana in the 1930s, it simultaneously depicts the despair in Europe during the second World War, and how incredibly disconcerting the war was […]

Daniel Keyes – Flowers For Algernon

Sometimes I wish I was intelligent enough to get into Mensa. Well, maybe not quite Mensa, but I do wish things came more easily to me than they do – things that take some people around me a just couple of hours take me a couple of days, at least, and it frustrates the living […]

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