Christos Tsiolkas – The Slap

A Gen-X story, The Slap is set in Melbourne with a Greek family at the pivot point. Hector, the protagonist, is married to Aisha, an Indian girl. The two of them are the envy of their friends, set in their perfect lives, with two children. Of course, there is no such thing as perfection, once […]

Paul Murray – Skippy Dies

Paul Murray’s second book, Skippy Dies, has been long listed for the Man Booker Prize 2010, and to be honest, that’s the main reason why I picked up this book. I had added it to my to-read list when claire (@ kissacloud) mentioned it ages ago, but it just kind of sat on the list, […]

Emma Donoghue – Room

This is probably one of the most gripping books I’ve read this year. I almost feel guilty that I didn’t take Audrey Niffenegger’s advice, scrolled across the book cover: Room is a book to read in one sitting. That’s what working life does to you, I guess. I did read the last fifty pages or […]

Lisa Moore – February

Melancholic – that’s the first word that came to my mind when I finished this book. I’m guessing that’s how Helen, the protagonist, felt for a major part of her adult life. Her husband, Cal, had been on the Ocean Ranger that sunk in 1982, off the coast of Newfoundland – there were no survivors. […]

Andrea Levy – The Long Song

I apologise for my thoughts on this book at the very outset. I’m going through a bit of a stressful phase right now, and while normally, it doesn’t affect the way I approach books, I’m not completely convinced that it hasn’t this time ’round. I mean, The Long Song was longlisted for the Orange Prize, […]

David Mitchell – Black Swan Green

About five years back, with the launch of the iPod Shuffle, Apple declared “random is the new order” to the world, as “life is random” so we should “give chance a chance.” What does any of this have to do with Black Swan Green? Well, nothing, really! However, it does have a lot to do […]

James Scudamore – Heliopolis

Ludo, born in the favela of Heliopolis (a shantytown), is “lucky.” He’s escaped a life of squalor, on being formally adopted by the extremely rich Carnicelli family, who have also hired his mother as a cook in their farmhouse. When she had nothing but a handful of beans to her name, the tough nugget of […]

David Mitchell – The Thousand Autumns Of Jacob De Zoet

In terms of books being confusing and complex, this one ranks right up there. New characters being introduced every couple of pages, the story taking dramatic turns, changing from showing corruption while trading in the 18th-19th century to a surreal adventure story, and there’s a love story thrown in, just for good measure as well. […]

Sarah Hall – How To Paint A Dead Man

I wasn’t planning on reading the entire Booker long list, prior to the short list being announced. However, there were a couple of books that intrigued me, and Sarah Hall’s How To Paint A Dead Man was one of them. Initially, I was torn between Heliopolis (James Scudamore) and this one, but, I held both […]

Samantha Harvey – The Wilderness

I almost bought this book two months back, but, for some unexplainable reason, I didn’t. About a week back, I found the first edition signed hardback in a second-hand bookstore, and literally jumped with glee. Saying buying this for £2.50 is a bargain is an understatement of sorts. The Wilderness follows the story of Jake, […]

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